Q&A: Mailing Photography Promos

Amy V. Cooper Posted by Amy V. Cooper on Feb. 27, 2020


I’ve fielded some great questions about sending promos in the mail this week. I wanted to share some of my responses with all of you:

Q: I’m sending out print promos to some places where there are multiple people I want to reach within the same company. Is it bad to send one promo addressed to multiple people? I’m wondering if they are all sitting next to each other, would sending multiple promos be necessary?


A: I always default to sending individual promos. You want the recipient to feel special/chosen, and I’ve always recommended including a personal note to each person with the reason why you reached out to them specifically. Additionally, don’t assume that all creatives are sitting in the same space. Especially at advertising agencies, creatives may sit with each other or they may be sitting with their client teams (with their producers, writers, account executives for the client or project they are currently focused on.)

Another thing to keep in mind, one creative may get the promo and throw it away or they may like it and file it rather than sharing it. Sending individual promos also increases your chances for creatives to take that promo with them when they leave that company.

In the past, If I really liked a promo or photographer, I might keep that mailer for years. You can read more information on what titles to target at agencies in this article.

Q: Clear or opaque envelopes?


A: This is a tough one but I usually go with opaque. If you send your promo in a clear envelope, creatives will judge it right away from what they can see. That can be a good or a bad thing. If you send a food promo to an art buyer who is busy or just returned from vacation with a stack of mail on her desk and is not currently working on a food account, that better be a mind-blowing image peeking through the plastic- otherwise it might get a speed sweep into the recycling bin.

An opaque envelope however, especially when it’s hand-addressed, creates a bit of mystery and may be slightly more likely to get opened. Your envelope is your knock at the door. I always encourage my clients to take their time not only in hand-addressing promos, but in choosing their envelopes, stamps, tape, return labels, etc. The more creativity and care you put in to it, the more likely it will get opened. Think about the texture and quality of your promos and envelopes, the pens you use to write with, the personal note you put inside. You are sending these to people who create beautiful marketing pieces for a living… Creative to creative, you want to stand out.

Have a question about marketing your photography business? Send me an email or DM, #ImRootingForYou!


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More About Amy V. Cooper

Amy V. CooperAmy is a photography business consultant and coach, and founder of the artist representation agency, Trove Artist Management. She has worked in the photography industry for over 20 years as a photo editor, art buyer, digital asset manager, consultant, and rep. Amy has worked with clients such as UPS, Coca-Cola, Microsoft, MTV, Capital One, Teen Vogue, The New Yorker, Esquire, and more. As a consultant, Amy specializes in helping her photographers better understand their target market, edit their work to reflect that market, develop marketing strategies, goals accountability, and building confidence to attract the clients that they really want to be working with.

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